Diversity

Salesforce spent another $2.7 million to adjust pay gaps related to race and gender

Ensuring equal pay is an ongoing task, Salesforce has found. In the past year, Salesforce spent $2.7 million to address pay discrepancies across gender worldwide and race in the U.S. Where Salesforce is making progress is in the number of people affected by unequal pay. Last year, Salesforce made pay adjustments (salaries and bonuses) for 11 percent of its employees compared to just 6 percent this time around. “Our latest assessment shows that equal pay is a moving target, especially for growing companies in competitive industries,” Salesforce Chief People Officer Cindy Robbins wrote in a blog post. Since 2015, Salesforce has spent over $8 million to address the wage gaps pertaining to race and gender. Over the next year, Salesforce plans to hire an addition 8,000 people. That means the ta...

UK report urges action to combat AI bias

The need for diverse development teams and truly representational data-sets to avoid biases being baked into AI algorithms is one of the core recommendations in a lengthy Lords committee report looking into the economic, ethical and social implications of artificial intelligence, and published today by the upper House of the UK parliament. “The main ways to address these kinds of biases are to ensure that developers are drawn from diverse gender, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds, and are aware of, and adhere to, ethical codes of conduct,” the committee writes, chiming with plenty of extant commentary around algorithmic accountability. “It is essential that ethics take centre stage in AI’s development and use,” adds committee chairman, Lord Clement-Jones, in a statement. “The UK has a ...

The G.O.A.T. may be a zebra

Silicon Valley is obsessed with unicorns, startups that reach a valuation of $1 billion valuation or more. But Aniyia Williams and her team over at Zebras Unite are more interested in zebras. Unlike unicorns, zebras are real animals. So, when applied to startups, zebras are the ones that bring in actual revenue. When we talk about the greatest of all time (G.O.A.T.) in tech, it seems only reasonable that it would be a zebra, not necessarily a unicorn. Granted, it could be a zebra-unicorn blend, but it couldn’t be just be a unicorn. The zebra movement is all-inclusive, Williams told me on an episode of the CTRL+T podcast. That’s regardless of race, gender, sexuality, ability status and so forth. Its focus is on startups building businesses that approach issues from a social impact lens and ...

Edovo raises $9 million to provide incarcerated people with tablet-based education

Edovo, a tablet-based education startup for incarcerated people, has raised $9 million from Impact Engine, Lumina Foundation, Kapor Capital and others. Edovo works with facilities to bring in secure wireless networks and tablets that access Edovo’s educational platform. The incentive-based learning program covers a variety of areas, including literacy, college course work, cognitive behavioral therapy and vocational training. Upon completion of certain lessons, incarcerated individuals can receive certificates and entertainment options. They can also use Edovo to stay in touch with their loved ones. Right now, Edovo is operating in 20 states in over 50 facilities. To date, over 50,000 people have accessed Edovo’s educational content. “This investment powerfully reflects the impact of inves...

Twitter will publicize rules around abuse to test if behavior changes

As part of Twitter’s efforts to rid its platform of abuse and hate, the company is teaming up with researchers Susan Benesch, a faculty associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, and J. Nathan Matias, a post-doc research associate at Princeton University, to study online abuse. Today, Twitter is going to start testing an idea that if it shows people its rules, behavior will improve. Via TechCrunch. This appeared at the top of one user’s Notifications tab. “In an experiment starting today, Twitter is publicizing its rules, to test whether this improves civility,” Benesch and Matias wrote on Medium. “We proposed this idea to Twitter and designed an experiment to evaluate it.” The idea is that by showing people the rules, their behavior will improv...

White men still make the most money in tech, Hired says

Hired has released its annual pay equity report. Unsurprisingly, white men earn the most at $136,000 per year on average, followed by Asian men making a yearly average of $135,000. Here are some other stats that highlight the pay discrepancies in tech: Companies offer women 4 percent less than men, on average, for the same role at the same company Black and Latinx women are offered 90 cents for every dollar white men earn LGBTQ+ women are offered more than their non-LGBTQ counterparts Other fun (sad) facts: San Francisco has the smallest gender wage gap The gender wage gap gets worse as people get older More than half of women know they’ve been paid less than men in similar roles throughout their careers Unfortunately, the wage gap hasn’t changed since Hired’s 2017 report. The silver linin...

How big money can drive diversity in venture capital

Sharon Wienbar Contributor More posts by this contributor How to recruit, hire and retain female engineers How To Hire Female Engineers The world’s largest asset manager just called for more corporate responsibility in governance. Twenty-one countries already legislate diversity on corporate boards or mandate practices that enhance diversity in the workplace. The United States has avoided proactive rules, often citing adverse results from implementing quotas. But in the USA, money talks. And the money behind venture capital funds is starting to take diversity seriously. When Larry Fink, CEO of BlackRock (with $5.7 trillion under management), says, “We also will continue to emphasize the importance of a diverse board,” that is a lot of votes for diversity. Similarly, the largest private fou...

GV partner Lo Toney wants to raise $50 million to fund diverse investors

GV partner Lo Toney is looking to raise up to $50 million for his new fund, Plexo Capital, Axios first reported. Since 2017, Toney has been incubating Plexo Capital inside GV, formerly known as Google Ventures. The idea with Plexo Capital, which is backed by Alphabet, is to invest as a limited partner in seed funds led by people of color and/or female general partners, Toney said in an interview back in 2017 with Family Office Insights. There are very few black and Latinx investors, with only 2 percent of investment team members at VC firms identifying as black and just 1 percent identifying as Latinx, according to the National Venture Capital Association. Meanwhile, just 12 percent of investment professionals are women, according to Kapor Center for Social Impact’s latest report. Here’s h...

Jack Dorsey wants to measure how Twitter affects society

Earlier this month, Twitter began soliciting proposals from the public to help the platform capture, measure and evaluate healthy interactions. Today, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and other members of the team held a public conversation via Periscope about the company’s new initiative to measure healthy interactions on Twitter. As Twitter previously noted, the goal is to come up with metrics to measure the health of the interactions on Twitter. But Twitter eventually wants to take that a step further, Dorsey said today. “Ultimately we want to have a measurement of how it affects the broader society and public health, but also individual health, as well,” Dorsey said. Although Twitter does not have the tools to measure the effectiveness of longer content, Dorsey says increasing the character lim...

Google marks International Women’s Day with a “women led” attribute for business listings

To mark International Women’s Day, Google will start letting business owners identify their listings as “Women led” on Google My Business. Once enabled, this means their business entry on Google Maps or Google Search will display a female symbol captioned “Women led” alongside other attributes, or badges which give users more information at a glance and may include “Has Wi-Fi” or “Free Parking,” for example. “We strive to organize the world’s information in a way that is inclusive of all people,” a Google spokesperson told TechCrunch. “Last year, we added an LGBTQ-friendly attribute in time for Pride. This year we’ve added the women-led attribute to empower women-led businesses to succeed online and enable people to find businesses to visit using Google Maps and Search.” (If you’re wonderi...

These tech jobs can earn you the most money

In order to best negotiate your salary, being equipped with the knowledge of what other people are making can be immensely helpful. Generally speaking, you’re going to earn more money working at a public tech company versus a private tech company, according to new data from culture workplace and salary comparison platform Comparably. And the bigger the company, according to Comparably’s data, the more money you’ll make. A senior developer at a private tech company with little funding earns about $73,000 a year while a senior developer at a public company earns an average of about $130,000. No matter where you work, however, you’re going to make the most money as an architect or senior product manager, according to Comparably. Regarding location, San Francisco public companies pay the most ...

SF mayoral candidate London Breed says the city has a ‘complex’ relationship with tech

San Francisco Board of Supervisors President London Breed wants you to remember that she was once, and will be the future of mayor of San Francisco, she said at the Lesbians Who Tech conference on Friday. For those unfamiliar with San Francisco local politics, Breed temporarily served as acting mayor following the untimely passing of SF Mayor Ed Lee in December. As a result of his passing before the completion of his term, San Francisco is holding a special election in June, in which Breed, Supervisor Jane Kim, former Supervisor Mark Leno and others are running for mayor. In addition to describing what it was like growing up in San Francisco and laying out some of the issues the city faces, like the lack of affordable housing, homelessness, and mental health and substance abuse, Breed call...

  • 1
  • 2
  • 4