Culture

Ne-Yo wants to make Silicon Valley more diverse, one investment at a time

Dressed in a Naruto t-shirt and a hat emblazoned with the phrase “lone wolf,” Ne-Yo slouches over in a chair inside a Holberton School classroom. The Grammy-winning recording artist is struggling to remember the name of “that actor,” the one who’s had a successful career in both the entertainment industry and tech investing. “I learned about all the things he was doing and I thought it was great for him,” Ne-Yo told TechCrunch. “But I didn’t really know what my place in tech would be.” It turns out “that actor” is Ashton Kutcher, widely known in Hollywood and beyond for his role in several blockbusters and the TV sitcom That ’70s Show, and respected in Silicon Valley for his investments via Sound Ventures and A-G...

Safe artificial intelligence requires cultural intelligence

Gillian Hadfield Contributor Share on Twitter Gillian Hadfield is the author of Rules for a Flat World: Why Humans Invented Law and How to Reinvent It for a Complex Global Economy and a professor of law and strategic management at the University of Toronto; a faculty affiliate at the Vector Institute for AI; and a senior policy advisor at OpenAI. More posts by this contributor To truly protect citizens, lawmakers need to restructure their regulatory oversight of big tech Saudi Arabia’s TechUtopia Neom will have to reinvent the rules to succeed Knowledge, to paraphrase British journalist Miles Kington, is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is knowing there’s a norm against putting it in a fruit salad. Any kind of artificial intelligence clearly needs to possess great knowledge. But i...

Up NEPA: When Unstable Electricity Becomes A Culture Passed Down Across Generations!

By Tade Oludayo Social problems confronting Nigerians are expressed in different social spaces: churches, mosques, beer parlours, stadium, recreation centres and schools to mention just a few. In these spaces, Nigerians share palatable and unpalatable life experiences confronting them. The church has become one of such space where life stories are told and right or […]Continue reading…

Distributed teams are rewriting the rules of office(less) politics

When we think about designing our dream home, we don’t think of having a thousand roommates in the same room with no doors or walls. Yet in today’s workplace where we spend most of our day, the purveyors of corporate office design insist that tearing down walls and bringing more people closer together in the same physical space will help foster better collaboration while dissolving the friction of traditional hierarchy and office politics. But what happens when there is no office at all? This is the reality for Jason Fried, Founder and CEO of Basecamp, and Matt Mullenweg, Founder and CEO of Automattic (makers of WordPress), who both run teams that are 100% distributed across six continents and many time zones. Fried and Mullenweg are the founding fathers of a movement that has inspired at ...

Facebook is going back to college

Ryan Craig Contributor More posts by this contributor Broadening education investments to full-stack solutions College for the 21st century Kids these days take a greater interest in practical things than we give them credit for. For example, this summer my 12-year-old son Leo was at sleepaway camp in Canada. When we received his first letter home, among camp platitudes, the two notable items reported were that one of his counselors was discharged from the Israeli Army a week before camp, while another was recently “mugged by three guys (one had a gun!) and got stabbed in the arm.” Leo reported the cabin was mesmerized when, as a reward, the counselor showed campers his sweater with a knife hole in it. America’s colleges and universities could learn a thing or two from Leo, because they co...

How Airbnb went from renting air beds for $10 to a $30 billion hospitality behemoth

Happy 10th anniversary Airbnb. When we first wrote about the company a decade ago, it was a spare website cobbled together by its founders for the low low price of $20,000. In the years since, the marketplace Airbnb created has radically transformed the rental landscape in cities, created an entirely new hospitality market and surged to a valuation of roughly $31 billion. We researched the number of airbeds sold every year because that’s how big we thought Airbnb could become. — Brian Chesky (@bchesky) August 12, 2018 As it prepares for an initial public offering in 2019, it’s worth a look back on how far the company has come, and how its founders’ vision for a new type of way to monetize unused apartment space for budget travelers has become the engine driving a new kind of travel and new...

Grand Seiko is an homage to watchmaking’s past

The 1960s were a beautiful time for watches. Horology was in its prime and the great names we know and love today – Rolex, Omega, Cartier – were just one of many watchmakers churning out commodity products to a world that needed to tell the time. Their watches – simple, elegant, and mechanically complex – were the ultimate in mechanical efficiency and design and no one did it quite as well as Seiko. This mechanical golden age ended in the late 1970s with the rise of the quartz watch but Seiko is resurrecting it with their Grand Seiko line of luxury pieces. Grand Seiko is special for a few reasons. First, it’s Seiko’s haute horlogerie skunkworks, allowing the company to experiment with all the fancy materials and techniques that Swiss watchmakers have worked with for years. The watches are ...

Your vegetables are going to be picked by robots sooner than you think

In the very near future, robots are going to be picking the vegetables that appear on grocery store shelves across America. The automation revolution that’s arrived on the factory floor will make its way to the ag industry in the U.S. and its first stop will likely be the indoor farms that are now dotting the U.S. Leading the charge in this robot revolution will be companies like Root AI, a young startup which has just raised $2.3 million to bring its first line of robotic harvesting and farm optimization technologies to market. Root AI is focused on the 2.3 million square feet of indoor farms that currently exist in the world and is hoping to expand as the number of farms cultivating crops indoors increases. Some estimates from analysis firms like Agrilyst put the planned expansions in in...

Corbyn Says Sorry for Labour’s `Real’ Antisemitism Problem

LISTEN TO ARTICLE SHARE THIS ARTICLE U.K. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn apologized to Britain’s Jewish community for the “real” problem of antisemitism in the nation’s main opposition as he sought to contain a row that threatens to undermine support for his party. “I acknowledge there is a real problem of antisemitism that Labour is working to overcome,” Corbyn said on Sunday in a video message on his official YouTube channel. “I am sorry for the hurt that has been caused to many Jewish people.” Jeremy Corbyn Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg It’s Corbyn’s second attempt in three days to allay concerns of British Jews, after an opinion piece he wrote for the Guardian last Friday — just before the start of the Jewish holy day — fell flat. A steady stream of negative press threa...

Europe’s Dark Past Makes a Comeback

SHARE THIS ARTICLE After shooting and wounding six Africans in the picturesque hilltop town of Macerata, Luca Traini draped himself in the Italian flag, gave a stiff-arm salute and waited for police. “Italy for the Italians!” he exclaimed. The incident involving the 28-year-old gunman with a neo-Nazi tattoo on his forehead dominated the final month of Italy’s election campaign locally. For all the outrage, Traini’s message resonated at the ballot box. In the vote on March 4, support for the anti-immigrant League surged massively in Macerata, helping to propel the party into government this month. “We’re famous for the wrong reasons,” said schoolteacher Maria Letizia Renzi, 56, as she walked her Labrador past the Fascist-era memorial to war victims where Traini gave himself up on Feb. 3. “I...

Saudis Dismiss Piracy Claim as Soccer Rights’ Spat Escalates

LISTEN TO ARTICLE SHARE THIS ARTICLE Saudi Arabia has strongly denied accusations it was behind a television service pirating multi-billion-dollar content, with a senior official saying that authorities have confiscated thousands of pieces of equipment being used to illegally watch premium soccer events like the World Cup. Saud al-Qahtani, a Saudi minister and a royal court adviser, said the nation’s football association has filed a complaint to FIFA, the world’s soccer governing body, detailing what he described as “transgressions against the kingdom and its leadership” by Qatar’s beIn Sports network. He called for an end to beIn Sports’ monopoly over the broadcasting rights for major competitions in the Middle East. “The ball is in the court of FIFA, international federations and organiz...

Netanyahu’s Wife Charged With Misuse of Public Funds

LISTEN TO ARTICLE SHARE THIS ARTICLE Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s wife has been charged with misusing public funds, compounding the first family’s legal problems as the attorney general weighs whether to indict the premier himself on suspicion of corruption. Sara Netanyahu has been charged with using nearly $100,000 of state money to cover unauthorized spending on high-end meals between September 2010 and March 2013. She has denied wrongdoing, and the prime minister has said the family is the victim of a political witch hunt by leftists and journalists seeking to depose his government. The Netanyahu family’s legal problems have gripped Israel for more than three years, and in the prime minister’s case threaten his political survival. Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit is re...