cybernetics

Safe artificial intelligence requires cultural intelligence

Gillian Hadfield Contributor Share on Twitter Gillian Hadfield is the author of Rules for a Flat World: Why Humans Invented Law and How to Reinvent It for a Complex Global Economy and a professor of law and strategic management at the University of Toronto; a faculty affiliate at the Vector Institute for AI; and a senior policy advisor at OpenAI. More posts by this contributor To truly protect citizens, lawmakers need to restructure their regulatory oversight of big tech Saudi Arabia’s TechUtopia Neom will have to reinvent the rules to succeed Knowledge, to paraphrase British journalist Miles Kington, is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is knowing there’s a norm against putting it in a fruit salad. Any kind of artificial intelligence clearly needs to possess great knowledge. But i...

Keeping artificial intelligence accountable to humans

Osonde Osoba Contributor As a teenager in Nigeria, I tried to build an artificial intelligence system. I was inspired by the same dream that motivated the pioneers in the field: That we could create an intelligence of pure logic and objectivity that would free humanity from human error and human foibles. I was working with weak computer systems and intermittent electricity, and needless to say my AI project failed. Eighteen years later — as an engineer researching artificial intelligence, privacy and machine-learning algorithms — I’m seeing that so far, the premise that AI can free us from subjectivity or bias is also disappointing. We are creating intelligence in our own image. And that’s not a compliment. Researchers have known for awhile that purportedly neutral algorithms can mirror or...

UK report urges action to combat AI bias

The need for diverse development teams and truly representational data-sets to avoid biases being baked into AI algorithms is one of the core recommendations in a lengthy Lords committee report looking into the economic, ethical and social implications of artificial intelligence, and published today by the upper House of the UK parliament. “The main ways to address these kinds of biases are to ensure that developers are drawn from diverse gender, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds, and are aware of, and adhere to, ethical codes of conduct,” the committee writes, chiming with plenty of extant commentary around algorithmic accountability. “It is essential that ethics take centre stage in AI’s development and use,” adds committee chairman, Lord Clement-Jones, in a statement. “The UK has a ...

MIT’s new chip could bring neural nets to battery-powered gadgets

MIT researchers have developed a chip designed to speed up the hard work of running neural networks, while also reducing the power consumed when doing so dramatically – by up to 95 percent, in fact. The basic concept involves simplifying the chip design so that shuttling of data between different processors on the same chip is taken out of the equation. The big advantage of this new method, developed by a team led by MIT graduate student Avishek Biswas, is that it could potentially be used to run neural networks on smartphones, household devices and other portable gadgets, rather than requiring servers drawing constant power from the grid. Why is that important? Because it means that phones of the future using this chip could do things like advanced speech and face recognition using neural...

Dbrain pitches a new token paying users crypto to train artificial intelligence

One of the continuing challenges that artificial intelligence programs face is how they receive and process the information they need to take actions. While the algorithmic tools that developers have harnessed to automate a dizzying number of different processes are incredibly good at processing information, these machine learning programs need to be taught what information to process — and for now it’s up to the humans that AI will eventually replace to train them. Dbrain, is a new startup that’s aiming to make sure that if people are going to be replaced by machines, they can at least get paid to train their replacements. With a pitch that “Dbrain makes AI happen”, the company is offering to pay users of its service in a cryptocurrency for the privilege of teaching machine learning-based...